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James David Hearing Care – Hartlepool’s leading ear wax removal specialist

Why do crickets have ears on their knees?...from the voice of Sir David Attenborough*

Why do crickets have ears on their knees?

*of course we haven’t actually got Sir David Attenborough on as a guest speaker (for Heaven’s sake we’re only a small, family ran ear clinic in Hartlepool) but if you read this out loud with your best Sir David impression, it might be just as good!

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Why do crickets have ears on their knees?

“Greetings, my dear friends! Today, we shall delve into the fascinating world of crickets and their unique anatomy.

Together we’ll unlock answers to questions on their hearing evolution, physiology and if they experience similar issues to Homosapiens such as earwax blockages and Tinnitus.

I have spent countless hours observing these creatures in their natural habitats and I have noticed something quite extraordinary – their ears are located on their knees!

 
Why are their ears in such an odd place?

Now, you may ask, why do crickets have ears on their knees? Well, let me tell you, it is a quite a remarkable adaptation that has evolved to serve a very specific purpose.

You see, crickets are nocturnal creatures and they rely on their hearing to navigate and communicate in the dark. Their knees are positioned close to the ground and by having their ears located there, they are able to detect the slightest vibrations and sounds from the ground more effectively. This enables them to locate their prey, communicate with other crickets, and avoid predators.

Their ears are tiny, spanning only a fraction of a millimetre long, giving them (and their cousins the Grasshoppers and Locusts) sole of the smallest ears in the animal kingdom.

Anatomy of a cricket’s ear

Remarkably, their ears share many similarities with ours, though there are still some striking differences:

1. Their Cochlea is an uncurled organ stretching down the frontal legs and is known as the acoustic vessel..

2. Along the same plane you’d find their Tympanic plate; a version of our Ossicles bones which again stretches down the frontal legs.

3. Our inner ears hold around 20000 hair cells which are critical to your hearing. Loss of these can result in Tinnitus or hearing loss. Crickets have the same hairs but only around 70 of them!

 
Do they work like human ears?

Now, I know what you may be thinking – “Do crickets suffer from Tinnitus or earwax blockages?” Well, I must say, this is a valid concern, but nature has a way of taking care of its creatures. Crickets have a self-cleaning mechanism that ensures their ears remain free from any blockages.

I must point out that there are no cricket audiologists available to help them should they encounter any hearing difficulties. But then again, crickets have been around for millions of years and they seem to be doing just fine without our assistance.

So there you have it, the ears on a cricket’s knees are a remarkable adaptation that has evolved to serve a specific purpose. It is a testament to the ingenuity and resourcefulness of nature and its ability to create solutions to the challenges faced by its creatures.

I hope you have found this information as fascinating as I have. Until next time, farewell!”

Back to reality 

If you want to listen to the ACTUAL Sir David, then follow this link to the WWF website.

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