Specialists in Earwax Removal


Glue Ear

Glue Ear James David Hearing Care

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Glue ear, also known as otitis media with effusion, is a common condition that affects many children. It occurs when fluid builds up in the middle ear, causing a blockage in the Eustachian tube. This blockage can cause hearing difficulties, speech delays, and other problems. It can be very similar to ETD in adults. In this article, we will explore the symptoms, causes, and treatments. 

 

Glue Ear – Symptoms

Symptoms can vary depending on the severity of the condition. Common symptoms include mild to moderate hearing loss, difficulty hearing or understanding speech, ear pain, a feeling of fullness in the ear, and difficulty sleeping. In some cases, children may also experience balance problems, dizziness, or difficulty concentrating.

 

Glue Ear – Causes

The causes are not always clear, but it is believed to be linked to a variety of factors. These can include a family history of the condition, allergies, exposure to secondhand smoke, and chronic ear infections. Children who attend daycare or school may also be at a higher risk of developing this condition due to exposure to other children with respiratory infections.

If left untreated, it can lead to more serious complications. These include speech and language delays, social and behavioural problems, and developmental delays. Therefore, it is important to seek treatment if you suspect your child may be experiencing these symptoms.

 

Glue Ear – Treatment

There are several treatments available depending on the severity of the condition. In some cases, simple measures such as waiting and observing may be recommended, as it can often resolve on its own over time. Other treatments may include antibiotics or the use of nasal sprays to reduce inflammation in the Eustachian tube. There is also a device to help open the eustachian tubes called an Otovent Balloon.

If these measures are not effective, more invasive treatments may be necessary. These can include the insertion of grommets, small tubes that are placed in the eardrum to help drain fluid from the middle ear, or a surgical procedure called adenoidectomy, which involves the removal of the adenoids in the back of the throat.

 

Glue Ear – Summary

In conclusion, glue ear is a common condition that affects many children. It occurs when fluid builds up in the middle ear, causing a blockage in the Eustachian tube. Symptoms of glue ear can include mild to moderate hearing loss, difficulty hearing or understanding speech, ear pain, and difficulty sleeping. If left untreated, glue ear can lead to more serious complications such as speech and language delays and developmental delays. However, there are several treatments available to manage the symptoms of glue ear, including antibiotics, nasal sprays, and the insertion of grommets or adenoidectomy.

If you suspect your child is experiencing these symptoms, speak with your doctor or ear specialist to determine the best course of treatment.

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Concerned about your child's hearing?

If you want further info before making a booking, then feel free to call us on 01429 233 091 or visit the NHS page on the subject here.